Wood Working

Jet JCDC-2 vs. Grizzly G0548ZP Showdown!

I just got Jet’s 2HP cyclone dust collector as an upgrade from Grizzly’s 2HP canister unit.  My main driver was to get a more quiet dust machine with a side benefit of it being easier to empty.  So while I had both machines on hand I measured their sound levels and air volume throughput.

The purpose of this post is not only to compare the two machines but also to give a little more real world data on the sound levels produced by dust collectors as opposed to what the manufacturers publish.

My testing instruments were:

The ambient noise levels in my shop measured @ 43 dBA.

Open Test

img_20170107_110340
Side by side testing

My first test put the machines out in the open with a short length of 4″ hose to constrict flow a bit.  I stood with the sound meter from where the photo was taken, about 10 feet away.

Grizzly:  86 dBA,  1065 CFM

Jet: 82 dBA, 1070 CFM

The Grizzly’s sound level was pretty close to the published 83-85 dBA level.  The Jet’s number was quite a bit higher than their published value of 76 dBA.

The air volume numbers were essentially the same, showing that the 4″ hose restricted them to the same volume.

Enclosed Test

img_20170107_114246Next I tested the dust collectors where they actually live, in this weird little room my basement has.  It’s about 8′ x 8′ and is where the water main comes through the floor.  As a woodworker it serves me pretty well by giving me a plash to stash a noisy machine.

On this test I measured the sound levels from about 15′ away next to my lathe.  This is where I will spend a lot of time with the collector running while sanding or turning dry wood so I was interested to see what my ears would be subjected to.

As for airflow I measured the flow at my lathe’s dust hose and my jointer’s dust hose.  Each of these machines are at the end of the two branches of my dust system.

Grizzly: 76 dBA, Lathe = 550 CFM, Jointer = 500 CFM

Jet: 70 dBA, Lathe = 550 CFM, Jointer = 532 CFM
img_20170107_113447The two jointer numbers are not the same because the dust collectors have different inlet locations and therefore force a different shape in the hose hooked up to them.  The Jet’s inlet is higher up so I was able to reduce the severity of the bends which netted me 30 more CFM.  The lathe piping run was able to keep approximately the same shape.  In the photo to the left, the PVC elbow is for the lathe while the flexible run is for the jointer.

I was happy to note that the Jet’s lower noise level is very noticeable from my lathe area.  In fact the whooshing noise from the dust hood is pretty much louder than the actual dust collector.

2 thoughts on “Jet JCDC-2 vs. Grizzly G0548ZP Showdown!

  1. Hi friend I’m trying to decide between a g0548zp with a super dust deputy and I don’t know what else. In your setup, does the JCDC2 get significant amounts of dust in the bag? I’m hoping for a cyclone that is efficient enough to keep the filter fairly clean, if possible within budget and heigh constraints.
    Also, after using the JCDC2 for some time and seasoning the filter, does it still have comparable suction to the grizzly as mentioned above?

    1. Hi Brian! The Jet Cyclone, because of its short cone length, does not do a great job of keeping debris out of the filter bag. I would say that I need to empty the filter bag for every 5 main bin empties.

      The Jet cyclone has retained excellent suction after being broken in, no problems there whatsoever.

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